TREASURE HUNT

My local library has a “free” section, fed by discarded library books and donations. Sometimes the books appear to come from the estates of learned people.  When I see a gem I grab it and someone I know gets a marvelous (tho used) Christmas present.  I recently came across two such volumes,  Animal Behavior, edited by Thomas Eisner and Edward O. Wilson, containing readings from Scientific America,  and–oh drat, I’ve already wrapped it for Christmas–a book of the complete campaigns of World War II, a reference book extraordinaire.

Then I realize that some of the best gems that stand out in my mind were those I ran into during graduate school, and I’ve never seen them surpassed. Why do we discount writings because of  an earlier copyright date?  I haven’t heard the insightful material discussed as well as in Your Perfect Right  by   Robert Alberti and Michael C. Emmons  c. 1970 and When Anger Hurts; Quieting the Storm Within by Matthew McKay.

In looking up the above sources I discovered that it’s more productive to Google by just the name of the book instead of Amazon. In my explorations I saw one used copy for $1 plus $5 shipping, and I was reminded to ponder over the practice of occasionally offering a $1 paperback for $101.37.  What shenanigans are folks up to?

[Sorry for the partial repeat of this–I earlier posted it halfway through, then forgot to save].

About Nan Mykel

At 79, I was just about to stop keeping a journal, but that felt like accepting that growth was finished. I don't want to be finished, yet! I'm 80 now, and struggling to communicate with you, if you'll come and set awhile. P.S. My how time flies! I'm 83 now.
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