Old Soldier – for D’Verse

He knew he was crotchety.

He’d forgotten how to love.

His cane held him upright and

allowed him to kick at stones

along the winding path home.

He wanted for nothing but

stones to kick and maybe a

bone to pick once he arrived.

Being crotchety was safe.

He knew it and they knew it,

and at night after supper

he could be found down

in his old soldier’s fox hole.

About Nan Mykel

At 79, I was just about to stop keeping a journal, but that felt like accepting that growth was finished. I don't want to be finished, yet! I'm 80 now, and struggling to communicate with you, if you'll come and set awhile. P.S. My how time flies! I'm 82 now.
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16 Responses to Old Soldier – for D’Verse

  1. And we can only imagine what he saw, what entitles him to be a bit crotchety. The problem with “old soldiers” is that they were never given the chance to deal with what we now call PTSD–they just swallowed it.

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  2. thotpurge says:

    being crotchety was safe…love that.,this is a deep poem.

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  3. I think his behavior mimics the protection of the trenches.

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  4. We always gravitate to our safe place. I love this bit, Nan!

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  5. Brian says:

    Some times the foxhole is the only safe place.

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  6. Bodhirose says:

    His behavior keeps people at arm’s length so he doesn’t have to open his heart and he’s afraid to leave the safety of the trenches after all those years…poor guy. Really enjoyed this, Nan!

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  7. lynn__ says:

    My favorite line: “being crochety was safe” 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Bryan Ens says:

    Sometimes crotchety is indeed a choice.

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  9. Uttley says:

    Stones to kick and a bone to pick… who could ask for anything more?

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  10. lillian says:

    Oh I love this — perfect picture of a wonderful curmudgeon! 🙂

    Like

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